“TripAdvisor” of aged care will be launched

By Yujin Luo

A new interactive website following the same standards of “TripAdvisor” will be developed for private and public aged care patients next year.

This platform, as the Queensland Government predicts, will enable the elders and their families to know how many staff and what sort of skills a health service dispose to take care of them. The administration believes that the online system will provide customers with more information when the time to choose an aged care service or a hospital comes.

The government says that private aged care providers will need to tell their clients and their families the level of care they can expect. If they refuse to give such information, the service will be disclosed too. Moreover, private residential aged care facilities can choose not to report their average daily resident care hours quarterly, but their decision to opt-out will be highlighted beside their name on the new website.

On the other hand, public health facilities will be asked to report this information. Also, Queensland Health’s residential aged care facilities will now have to registered nurses with a minimum nurse skill mix of 50% and for 30% of the total care staff. In the meantime, they must provide a minimum average of 3.65 hours of nursing and personal care to residents daily.

The Minister of Health and Ambulance Services Steven Miles said that the new laws will create and provide a legislative framework to collect and publish information from private and public hospitals. 

“This information will allow Queenslanders to compare public and private hospitals based on patient safety and quality indicator results as well as other consideration like parking and nearby accommodation,” Mr Miles said.

Queensland Health will now consult with private healthcare and aged care providers and develop the website over the next twelve months.

In October, the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety’s Interim Report found the aged care system fails to meet the needs of its older, vulnerable, citizens. It does not deliver uniformly safe and quality care, is unkind and uncaring towards older people and, in too many instances, it neglects them.